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20121201
20121231
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
LINKTV
Dec 5, 2012 3:00pm PST
traveled throughout britain and europe. often on foot, carrying a paintbox, he sketched and painted lyrically beautiful landscapes that changed the face of british art. when he died in 1851, he was one of the wealthiest and most famous artists in britain's history. throughout his career, he was always well aware of the key to his success. (reader) "the only secret i have got is damned hard work." (narrator) turner's life and career began in london. by 1788, at the age of 14, j.m.w. turner was apprenticed to an architect as a draftsman. architectural views appeared in his works throughout his life. the next year, turner entered the royal academy of arts school at somerset house. its president, the painter joshua reynolds, endorsed the prevailing view that ranked paintings in a clearly defined hierarchy. history painting was considered the noblest because it could portray events drawn from historical incidents, literature, the bible and mythology. genre painting, scenes from daily life, came next because they also offered examples of virtue to inspire the viewer. then came the more lo
WHUT
Dec 6, 2012 6:00pm EST
how the u.s. and europe did, for example, then we are guaranteed a 6 degree world. essentially, are urging him to step up to the world that he says he wants, to be a climate champion. we just had a press conference where the leaders of the least developed countries, the head of the african group, and small island states, shared exactly our concerns. to be honest, their voices were breaking when they spoke to us about how desperate they are about the negotiations and are clearly putting the blame on rich countries, particularly the united states, as one of the culprits. >> samantha smith, you are a leader of wwf, the world wildlife fund. >> that is what we call it in the united states. >> the level of this conference is a c within another c. if they turn one of them around, it looks like the logo of comedy central. that is funny, but not so much in the context of this subject. the news you were reading about environmentalists and the dangers they face. >> as i was preparing to come to doha, i heard about comments from someone that we are the culprits for the negotiations and the way
WHUT
Dec 5, 2012 6:00pm EST
economy is mainly based on tourism. incidently, mainly from europe. there have been changes in the patterns of the fish, so our whole economy is now at risk. if it continues like this, the seychelles, the sea level rise will not be our biggest problem but we will become a failed state. >> you are in the indian ocean. place yourself geographically with other islands off the coast of africa that you are near. >> we are in the group of 115 islands east of kenya, north of madagascar. we cover a huge area of the southwestern indian ocean. we're at the full mercy of what happens in the ocean. we are ocean people. anything that affects oceans, whether through increased temperatures, acidification, which is a bigger threat to khor reece that morning temperatures. >> what happened with acidification? why is that a result of climate change? >> we are reaching the limits of carbon dioxide and water can take out of the air. we have abused the oceans as we have abused the forests. >> people here have said they joked that they found something with a label made in the u.s.a., and that is co2. mar
LINKTV
Dec 17, 2012 8:00am PST
order to make real changes and progress. >> europe in her state building shooting or a man killed another man in front of the empire state building months ago. nine people were injured near the empire state building. all of them were injured by police when they unloaded 16 rounds in the shadow of the empire state building after a disgruntled former apparel designer, killing at to engage in a gunbattle with police. paul barrett, and coulter said, only one policy is ever been tried to deter mass murder -- concealed carry laws. >> i don't know what she means by only one policy has been shown. i don't know what social science she is pointing to. the hard truth for people on both sides of this debate is the social science is inconclusive. the best studies that have been done on the proliferation of separatearry laws image anyone who wants to conceal-carry license can have one. the best research has been done at yale university that says, quite candidly, we can not tell. we cannot find a good association between the liberalization of those laws, the fact it is easier to carry guns conce
LINKTV
Dec 5, 2012 8:00am PST
europe they speak all these languages. he couldn't do the french so well. anyway, albert einstein went through school and he did go all the way and got his ph.d. got his ph.d. in physics. and about this time, he had a hard time getting a job. his thinking was a little bit-- well, for one thing, he didn't have a high regard for many of the ideas at the time. you know, we always name the streets after military heroes, you know, and if someone really butchers millions of people, man, they put a big monument up for him, right? einstein thought that was kind of upside down. that we weren't choosing our heroes very properly. you know, he had kind of funny ideas. anyway, he wasn't too popular and had some trouble getting a job. but he did get a job with the help of his lady friend again. and he get on at the patent office, i guess, in switzerland, going over patents that were being submitted. and here's a guy with his ph.d. in physics and all that. anyway, he was interested also in light. he asked a teacher one time, "what would a light beam look like as it goes by?" teacher was, "well, it's
LINKTV
Dec 4, 2012 8:00am PST
. you can talk about traveling to europe, but can you go to the travel agent today and talk about traveling into time? we got new years coming up. we got a big one pretty soon, 2000, the year 2000, okay? and then 2001, 21st century, yeah? how about someone says, well, i'm not so much interested in that. i'm kind of a futurist. most of my friends are sort of like historians. they study history, where we've been. and it's kind of a real gas to know where we've been and where we are now. but my bit is where are we going? that's what i'm interested in. and what i'd like to do is i'd like to travel to the 25th century. and i'd like to see what human beings are doing for new year's eve in the year 2500, okay? what's it gonna be like then? now you go to your travel agent now and ask, you know what they're gonna say to you? the same thing they would have said to you a century ago if you told them you wanted to go from one part to the other part of the world in a metal airplane. they'd say, come on, you can't fly, metal's too heavy. but we can fly today. tomorrow, we might be century hoppi
LINKTV
Dec 6, 2012 3:00pm PST
established, tells you something about our history. in 1946, troops were returning home from europe and the pacific after world war ii. the joy of their return was tempered by public health concerns about what might be arriving with them. would their homecoming also reintroduce diseases that had been erased from the national scene? in the southeastern part of the united states, up until well into the 20th century, this was an area that had malaria. there was a lot of concern that as soldiers returned from areas, particularly in the pacific, which were high-incidence areas for malaria, that as they came back to military bases in the southeast, that there was a possibility that they would reintroduce malaria into the mosquito populations around those military bases, and so a little unit was established in atlanta, being that it was the largest city in the southeast, to make sure that those mosquito populations were kept under control around the military bases, so that malaria wouldn't come back in this part of the country. and the way you control it, and the way we did in this country, wa
LINKTV
Dec 26, 2012 3:00pm PST
states. >> there's been a longstanding shift in north america and europe toward para militarize policing using helicopter-style systems, using infrared sensors, using really, really heavy militarized weaponry. that has been longstanding fuelled by the war on drugs and other sort of explicit campaigns. more recently, there has been a big push since the end of the cold war by the big defense and security and i.t. companies to sell things like video surveillance systems, things like geographic mapping systems, and even more recently, drone systems that are being used in the assassination raids in afghanistan and pakistan and elsewhere. >> that is stephen graham, author of, "cities under siege: the new military urbanism." your final comment? expressing weaponization in the way we live. policing is one of the most obvious and current examples in that. i would suggest the pervasive development of john technology around the world that we are saying are being used for all sorts of purposes is really the thin edge of the wedge when it comes to these issues. we're going to see greater and
LINKTV
Dec 12, 2012 3:00pm PST
movement across europe and the world. so an agency like the british council, looking to promote british culture and a new view of britain as a great power but coming to terms with the aftermath of the second world war, would listen to these voices telling them that moore is the great artist around at the moment. (narrator) that international stature permitted moore to work on a larger scale, a dream since the early '30s. he could now afford to hire assistants, including anthony caro, who would go on to a successful career of his own, with works like the national gallery ledge piece, installed in 1978. i thought he was the most interesting sculptor around. and really, i went to ask him if i could work with him, work for him, because i'd had too traditional a studentship. a studentship, really, where we were taught by people who thought that art was about nymphs and fawns and generals on horses and that. i used to drive him into london from much hadham and we'd talk about art. we'd have little conversations about, you know, "did you go to the national gallery today?" "what did you
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)